Atlanta, GA,
16
June
2017
|
09:02 PM
America/New_York

Podcast Addresses the Importance of Caring for Caregivers

Caring for a person with an injury or a neurodegenerative disease can be extremely challenging. Beyond the potential physical exhaustion caregivers may experience, they also may experience emotional and psychological changes when having to take care of someone else, and it is a potential problem that needs to be addressed. 

In a new podcast with Shepherd Radio, Deborah Backus, director of multiple sclerosis research at Shepherd Center and co-author of the paper “Coping With Caregiver Burnout When Caring for a Person With Neurodegenerative Disease: A Guide for Caregivers,” discusses the importance of recognizing and addressing the impact of caregiving.

Download the podcast as an audio file above, or access it at shepherd.org/radio.

Deborah Backus, PT, Ph.D., FACRM, is the director of multiple sclerosis research at the Eula C. and Andrew C. Carlos Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Rehabilitation and Wellness Program at Shepherd Center. She is president-elect of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine (ACRM). Dr. Backus has 30 years of experience as a rehabilitation clinician, educator and researcher. As part of the MS Rehabilitation and Wellness Program at Shepherd Center, Dr. Backus coordinates research efforts to study the health and wellness needs of people at varying stages of MS.

About Shepherd Center

Shepherd Center, located in Atlanta, Georgia, is a private, not-for-profit hospital specializing in medical treatment, research and rehabilitation for people with spinal cord injury, brain injury, multiple sclerosis, spine and chronic pain, and other neuromuscular conditions. Founded in 1975, Shepherd Center is ranked by U.S. News & World Report among the top 10 rehabilitation hospitals in the nation. In its more than four decades, Shepherd Center has grown from a six-bed rehabilitation unit to a world-renowned, 152-bed hospital that treats more than 900 inpatients, 575 day program patients and more than 7,100 outpatients each year.